Posts tagged: Krishna

Different Kinds of Bhakti and Karma

Gaudiya PhilosophySandarbhasComments Off on Different Kinds of Bhakti and Karma

Question: Could you specify the difference between āropa-siddhā-bhakti and karma-miśrā-bhakti as defined by Srīla Jīva Gosvami in Bhakti Sandarbha? Answer: Āropa-siddhā-bhakti consists of activities...   Read More

The State of Atma while Dreaming

Questions & AnswersComments Off on The State of Atma while Dreaming

Question: Srila Prabhupada said many times in his books that while dreaming the soul in his subtle body “goes places”. At least that is...   Read More

God’s Personal and Impersonal Features – Part 2

Continuation of a discussion following a seminar in Terre de Ciel: Every morning, Krishna’s mother Yashoda used to make butter from milk. She heated...   Read More

Krishna – A Warmonger?

By Satyanarayana Dasa: While traveling in the West and lecturing on the Bhagavad Gita, one of the most common questions asked by peace loving Western students is, “Why is Krishna preaching and almost forcing Arjuna to take up weapons against his own kinsmen while Arjuna shows no interest in it and argues against the ghastly warfare and its irreligious and immoral outcome?”

Universal Form, Animal Killing, Bhagavata Commentaries

Question: Usually we hear that on the battlefield of Kuruksetra, only Arjuna saw the virata-rupa. But sometimes it is said that others saw it as well. Do you know where this alternate idea is stated specifically? I found a reference from Sridhara Maharaja’s disciple, Govinda Maharaja.

The Transcendental Nature of the Holy Name – Part 1

By Satyanarayana Dasa: In his Bhagavata-sandarbha, Śrīla Jīva Gosvāmī establishes on the basis of various Vedic scriptures that the birth and actions of the Lord are transcendental and distinct from those of mortal beings. Jīva Gosvāmī furthermore verifies that Kṛṣṇa’s names are also spiritual. The Lord is called anāmā (lit. nameless), because He does not have material names.

The Vaiṣṇava Concept of Māyā

Based on Śrīla Jīva Gosvāmī’s Bhagavat Sandarbha. By Satyanarayana Dasa. The Lord has two types of energy: parā and aparā. Parā means distant, beyond, superior, and so on. The energy is called parā because it is superior to, or beyond, the material energy, which is thus called aparā, i.e. near or inferior. In the Bhagavad Gītā, Kṛṣṇa states that the living beings can be counted as parā, because of their conscious nature:

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