Sankhya-Yoga TTC

This Teacher’s Training Course provides you with sufficient knowledge and experience to become a successful yoga teacher and you can also opt to do advanced courses in the future to master yoga further. We do not follow a specific ‘type’ of yoga but instead, we practice ‘sankhya-yoga’, which aims to integrate yogic theory and physical practice (asana) to the maximum extent. Maharishi Patanjali, the founder of yoga, prescribed certain rules for humans to follow to be productive members of society, and he prescribed a code of conduct that we try to inculcate among students through a systematic understanding of the same.

 

Jiva Institute for Vedic Studies in Vrindavan

Location

This course will take place in Vrindavan (160 km from Delhi), a small town located on the banks of the sacred river Yamuna. Vrindavan is one of the seven most sacred towns in India, due to its association with Lord Shri Krishna and where some of the greatest yogis and devotees have spent a part of their lives to attain knowledge and enlightenment. Vrindavan is a global village, where Krishna devotees from almost every corner of the world live and enjoy its devotional charm. The course venue is pleasant and offers hassle-free accommodations, along with convenient access to main attractions and local markets.

Jiva dining hallIt is conducted by the Jiva Institute (Ashram), which is well known for its scholarly activities and promotion of bhakti yoga and Vaishnava culture through a scientific and formal approach. The Jiva Institute has a global character, as devotees from around the world visit to study ancient Indian texts and philosophy.

 

Our Teachers

The yoga course is taught by highly qualified teachers under the guidance of respected Babaji, who is an authority on the Sankhya-yoga philosophical system.

The teachers for this course are from very diverse fields of knowledge. Most of them have lived in Vrindavan for a long time and are familiar with traditional Indian cultural values, Vedic scriptures; such as the Bhagavad Gita, and the essence of various aspects of yoga. In addition to this course, our teachers will be available for exploring the surroundings of Vrindavan.

Satyanarayana Dasa (Babaji)

Satyanarayana Dasa Babaji

Born in India in 1954, Satyanarayana Dasa was drawn to the spiritual traditions of his native country from a young age. After receiving a postgraduate degree in 1978 from the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi and working in the United States for four years, he returned to India,

where he studied the formal systems of Indian philosophy known as Sad-darsana), under the direct guidance of his guru, Sri Haridas Sastri Maharaja, and Swami Sarana Maharaja. Satyanarayana Dasa was formally educated for more than twenty-five years, while he dedicated himself to becoming a bhakti-yoga practitioner. In 1991, he accepted the traditional Vaisnava order of a renounced life, babaji-vesa. His main focus has been the work of Jīva Gosvāmī. In particular, he has been translating the Sat Sandarbhas into English and providing commentary. He also earned four shastric degrees and received both a law degree and a Ph.D. in Sanskrit from Agra University. Satyanarayana Dasa is the founder and director of the Jīva Institute of Vaishnava Studies in Vrindavan. He has authored eighteen books on Indian culture and philosophy and contributed several important essays to many prestigious journals. In 2013, he was honored by the president of India, Sri Pranab Mukherjee, for his extraordinary contribution in presenting Vedic culture and philosophy, both nationally and internationally. In 2015, he was officially installed as the Mahanta of the Jiva Institute. He has a long practical experience in teaching ancient Yogic texts to international and Indian scholars.

 

Aami Kristal

Krsna DasAami (Krishna Dasa) taught traditional Hatha yoga at the Patanjali Yoga Foundation. He has been practicing and teaching yoga and wellness for over ten years. He is an Ayurvedic nutritional consultant, specializing in dosha balance, Theta Healing technique, and Bio re-programming seed. He is also a Vedic astrologer from the royal lineage of Jagannath Puri.

He has gained experience in the field of sustainable development by working with indigenous communities in South America, which has taught him different self-healing techniques and introspection. He founded the World Conscious Pact, the University of Ancestral Wisdom, the United Nations of the Spirit, the Global Eco-Villages Network, and the Council of Sustainable Settlements of the Americas. He has a long practical experience in teaching ancient yogic postures, their correct positions and their importance in yoga sadhana.

He now resides in Vrindavan, where he is currently studying the Vedic scriptures under the guidance of his Guru, Satyanarayana Dasa Babaji.

 

Ekaterina

KantaEkaterina (Kanta Dasi) is a Hatha yoga and meditation instructor. Her mother was a yoga teacher, and Ekaterina has been practicing since 2006. She is a graduate of the School of Patanjali in Rishikesh and has studied with well-known Russian yoga masters, such as Dmitry Demin, Gleb Mazaev, and Maxim Tsuguy. She has been a yoga and fitness teacher in leading fitness centers in Belarus since 2016, and she has been conducting online yoga courses in European countries. Since 2020 Ekaterina has been teaching yoga and spinal therapy in Belarus, Israel, Russia, and Ukraine.

 

Jaya Devi

JayaJaya Devi is the co-coordinator of the Jiva Institute’s yoga course and has been living in India for the past 20 years. She serves as a friendly mentor for all the foreign students who study in Vrindavan. She also coordinates the extracurricular activities in and around Vrindavan. She has a good knowledge of Indian spiritual heritage and a PhD in Sanskrit. She is the author of From Taj to Vraj, a book on feminine spirituality.

 

 

Dauji Das
DaujiDauji is your Vrindavan Tour guide. Originally from the United Kingdom, he now resides at the Jīva Institute. He is an editor and publisher of Bhakti books. He is available for free consultation on any extracurricular matter.

 

 

Stay and surroundings

The Ashram is located in a clean, pollution-free, hygienic atmosphere, and the course venue is managed by an efficient hospitality staff to look after accommodations, food, and travel arrangements. Surroundings offer ample opportunities to visit important temples and ashrams throughout Vrindavan. The institute is well-furnished and clean with the following facilities.

  • Air-conditioned and non-air-conditioned rooms with attached toilets and hot water
  • Clean drinking water (RO)
  • Full wi-fi campus
  • Hot water (Geyser) in all bathrooms
  • 24/7 support staff
  • Satvik cafeteria serving nutritious vegetarian food at economic prices
  • Travel-related services to explore nearby places
  • Garden and green surroundings
  • Library (with a rich collection of books on various relevant subjects)
  • Spacious dining hall for regular meals
  • Located in the heart of Vrindavan (most attractions at walking distance)
  • Spacious yoga hall
  • In-house beautiful temple with daily kirtan and discourses on Bhagavad Gita (anyone can join freely)

Course Fee

Our yoga teachers training (YTT) programm is a residential course. The fee of USD 1650 per person includes accommodations (private room with private bathroom) and all vegetarian meals at the institute. The registration fee is USD 200 (nonrefundable advance) to be submitted along with the application. The remaining fee can be paid upon arrival. In case of emergency and other unavoidable circumstances, we may permit students to opt for the same course within the period of two years.

Calendar (Course Dates)

  • 22 September to 19 October , 2022
  • 23 October to 19 November , 2022
  • 23 November to 18 December , 2022
  • 1 February to 28 February, 2023
  • 1 March to 28 March, 2023
  • 1 April to 28 April, 2023

Daily Schedule – (200-Hours Yoga Teacher Training)

Our YTT program follows a well-planned schedule and about 6 to 7 training hours daily are assigned to learning different aspects of yoga. Our daily schedule begins as early as 5:30 a.m. with a short meditation followed by yogic postures and classes in philosophy, anatomy and physiology. Students can also enjoy excursions to nearby places in their free time. During the course, vegetarian meals suitable for a Yogic life style will be served along with seasonal fruits and herbal tea. Home assignments are also given to students during the course to enable them to cultivate an insight into the subject.

05:30 am Wakeup call and warm up 05:45 am Morning Tea
06:15 am Short Prayer 06:30 am Practice of Yoga Asanas
07:30 am Pranayama and Mantra Chanting 09:00 am Breakfast
10:30 am Meditation (Dhyan) techniques 11:30 am Discourse on ‘Sankhya –Yoga’ Philosophy
12:30 pm Lunch 03:00 pm Anatomy/Physiology related to Yoga practice
03:30 pm Tea break 04:00 pm Mantra Chanting , Discourse on ‘Sankhya-yoga ’ in context of meditation / Teaching Methodology in Yoga practice
04:30 pm Yoga Nidra / Meditation 05:00 pm Hatha/Ashtanga Yoga Asanas
06:30 pm End of the daily schedule 07:15 Pm Dinner and rest

Syllabus of Yoga teachers Training Course

Shatkarma

(Internal body Cleansing activities)

These ancient yogic cleansing techniques are practiced for purification of the body. There are six Shatkarmas in the Hatha tradition. They are used to help clear the body of excess mucus, fat, and bile, and should only be practiced under the guidance of a competent teacher. During the course on special days these Shatkarmas will be demonstrated and taught to participants as after practicing Shatkarma ,one need to have specially very light food and rest for a while.
Asanas (Physical Postures) There are 84 asanas in the Hatha tradition. These poses are used to steady the body and mind, making the practitioner more energetic, free from disease, and ready for the practice of meditation. These are often the most familiar part of yoga tradition in the modern world.

Pranayamas

(Breathing techniques)

These practices utilize breathing to control and influence the flow of vital life force (prana) in the body. Pranayama’s are practiced after asana practice. They should be practiced under the guidance of a competent teacher, as the effects of these techniques on the body can be quite powerful.

Meditation

 

(Dhyan)

Dhyana, or meditation, is the practice of calming the mind and body through controlling the thoughts, calming the senses, and deep concentration. There are many ancient yogic meditation practices, designed to bring the practitioner closer to spiritual awareness and understanding. After knowing different meditation techniques, you can find the most suitable one for yourself to practice regularly.

Mudras

 

 

Mudras are advanced yogic postures/techniques that alter mood, attitude, and perception, thereby deepening awareness and concentration. They have a subtle but powerful effect on energy flow in the body and thus are a good preparation for deeper spiritual practices.

Bandhas

 

Bandha’s are bodily locks that help to redirect the flow of energy in the body. They involve locking the chin, abdomen, and perennial region. As they are an advanced practice, they are best practiced individually under able instruction before being incorporated into other yogic practices.
Sankhya-Yoga Philosophy A successful yoga practice absolutely depends on the proper understanding of the ancient yoga philosophies as described in the two schools of Indian yoga philosophy below. Sankhya explains the eternal principles and yoga teaches the way to achieve the goals prescribed in Sankhya philosophy.
Yoga System (of Patanjali) Yoga – An Introduction to yoga and its basic elements
Different types of yoga – Karma, Jñāna and Bhakti
Concept of Atma ,Consciousness and awareness Yama, Niyama (Principles of hygienic, regulated and socially acceptable lifestyle including Shatkarma)
Pranayama (healthy breathing )
Pratyahara (Self control )
Dharna (contemplation ), Dhyana (meditation), Samadhi (transcognitive state)
Sankhya (Wisdom) System of Kapila Evolution of world due to interaction between Purusha (Self) and Prakarti (Nature). Inevitability of understanding distinction between body,mind,Consciousness,Chita, Ego and Self for progress in spiritual life.
Anatomy& Physiology related to Yoga It’s important for yoga teachers to understand the movements and composition of the human body, as well as working of the digestive, respiratory, circulatory, and nervous systems. This knowledge will help teachers to address the safety concerns of students and give proper adjustments, while helping students understand the full benefits and limitations of their practice.
Theory of Panch Kosha(Five layers believed to be covering the Atma)

1.     Aannamaya kosha, “foodstuff” sheath (Anna)

2.     Pranamaya kosha, “energy” sheath (Prana/apana)

3.     Manomaya kosha “mind-stuff” sheath (Manas)

4.     Vijnanamaya kosha, “wisdom” sheath (Vijnana)

5.     Anandamaya kosha, “bliss” sheath (Ananda)

 

 

Ayurveda

(Classic Indian System of well-being)

 

Ayurveda, literally meaning ‘the science of life,’ is an ancient tradition of healing the body through awareness of the functions of the three Gunas (mental dispositions: Sattva,Raja and Tamas)– both the internal and external functions. It encompasses nutrition and massage therapy that is practiced to improve the overall well-being of the body and mind.

 

Teaching methodology for Yoga Guidance for becoming a successful Yoga teacher: The art of speaking and performing asanas in a class room setting.

Shri Bhagavad Gita

 

This ancient text is one of the most important books for understanding yoga, as it outlines the origins of yoga philosophy as passed down through the centuries. A solid understanding of this scripture is necessary for anyone interested in the yoga traditions. Explanation of Sankhya-yoga Philosophy as described by lord Krishna in Shrimad Bhagavad Gita

Detailed syllabus and description

Days Anatomy Philosophy
1 Spine upper 7 Ha-tha+Meru+Surya Namaskar
Spine middle 12
Spine Under  6
2 Feet to Hips (Bones-Musles) Muladhara/Swadishtana
  Feet to Hips (Bones-Musles) Muladhara/Swadishtana
3 Organs Manipuraka/Anahata
4 Upper part to neck (Bones-Musles) Vishuddha/Ajna
5 Respiratory System Sahasrara/Patanjali yoga sutras 1
6 Circulatory System Patanjali yoga sutras 2/History of Yoga

Every Day Practice

Day Bhagavad Gita Pranayamas and Sat Kriyas Meditations
1 Cap 1 (1-13) Yogic Breathing, Kapalabhati, Bhastrika,Mula Bandha, Uddiyana Bandha. Om Meditation
2 Cap 1 (14-27) Yogic Breathing, Anuloma-Viloma, Nadisodhana, Jalandhar Bandha, Mahabandha. Tratak Meditation
3 Cap 1 (27-40) Yogic Breathing, Shitkari, Shitali, Agnisar Dhauti, Nauli Silence Meditation
4

Cap 1 (40-47)

Cap 2 (1-6)

Yogic Breathing, Neti, Ujjay, Bhramari. Sound Meditation
5 Cap 2 (7-20) Yogic Breathing, Kapalabhati, Bhastrika,Mula Bandha, Uddiyana Bandha. Kirtan Meditation
6 Cap 2 (21-34) Yogic Breathing, Anuloma-Viloma, Nadisodhana, Jalandhar Bandha, Mahabandha. Walking meditation
7 Cap 2 (35-48) Yogic Breathing, Shitkari, Shitali, Agnisar Dhauti, Nauli Om Meditation
8 Cap 2 (49-61) Yogic Breathing, Neti, Ujjay, Bhramari. Tratak Meditation
9

Cap 2 (62-72)

Cap 3 (1-3)

Yogic Breathing, Kapalabhati, Bhastrika,Mula Bandha, Uddiyana Bandha. Silence Meditation
10 Cap 3 (4-17) Yogic Breathing, Anuloma-Viloma, Nadisodhana, Jalandhar Bandha, Mahabandha. Sound Meditation
11 Cap 3 (18-31) Yogic Breathing, Shitkari, Shitali, Agnisar Dhauti, Nauli Kirtan Meditation
12

Cap 3 (32-43)

Cap 4 (1-2)

Yogic Breathing, Neti, Ujjay, Bhramari. Walking meditation
13 Cap 4 (3-16) Yogic Breathing, Kapalabhati, Bhastrika,Mula Bandha, Uddiyana Bandha. Om Meditation
14 Cap 4 (17-30) Yogic Breathing, Anuloma-Viloma, Nadisodhana, Jalandhar Bandha, Mahabandha. Tratak Meditation
15

Cap 4 (31-42)

Cap 5 (1-2)

Yogic Breathing, Shitkari, Shitali, Agnisar Dhauti, Nauli Silence Meditation
16 Cap 5 (3-16) Yogic Breathing, Neti, Ujjay, Bhramari. Sound Meditation
17

Cap 5 (17-29)

Cap 6 (1)

Yogic Breathing, Kapalabhati, Bhastrika,Mula Bandha, Uddiyana Bandha. Kirtan Meditation
18 Cap 6 (2-15) Yogic Breathing, Anuloma-Viloma, Nadisodhana, Jalandhar Bandha, Mahabandha. Walking meditation
19 Cap 6 (16-29) Yogic Breathing, Shitkari, Shitali, Agnisar Dhauti, Nauli Om Meditation
20 Cap 6 (30- 43) Yogic Breathing, Neti, Ujjay, Bhramari. Tratak Meditation
21

Cap 6 (44-47)

Cap 7 (1-10)

Yogic Breathing, Kapalabhati, Bhastrika,Mula Bandha, Uddiyana Bandha. Silence Meditation
22 Cap 7 (11-24) Yogic Breathing, Anuloma-Viloma, Nadisodhana, Jalandhar Bandha, Mahabandha. Sound Meditation
23

Cap 7 (25-30)

Cap 8 (1-8)

Yogic Breathing, Shitkari, Shitali, Agnisar Dhauti, Nauli Kirtan Meditation
24 Cap 8 (9- 22) Yogic Breathing, Neti, Ujjay, Bhramari. Walking meditation
25 Cap 8 (23-28) Yogic Breathing, Kapalabhati, Bhastrika,Maha Bandha, Bhramari. Tratak Meditation
26 Exam about Gita Yogic Breathing, Anuloma-Viloma, Nadisodhana, Maha Bandha, Ujjay Kirtan Meditation
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